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but also with the tamp pais public library to have two events showcasing the rich arab america culture that exists here in the city of san francisco and i want to thank you all for coming and i want to introduce joaquin for resident who ska great member of our community and has helped organize this event. (applause). . thank you very much and good evening everyone on behalf of mayorly who will be joining us in a few moments i want to say thanks to all of you for being here tonight it's always a pleasure for you go to welcome the community into city hall - because you remind us our purpose in government so to serve and you you certainly bring life and culture and community into our very state halls and bring life to us, so thank you again. i want to thank the nominating committee and the planning committee for their excellent work in ensuring that those very important community members who do so much to ensure that our communities remain strong and vibrant, those who are under served typically continue to be served that our communities are strengthened and our ties are bound and strong.
. these are shaped america and in the same pillars are often largely or even entirely ignored in shaping the postwar world in world war i and later decolonization of the world, part of the second volume. this book follows a 50 year struggle between those who call constitutionalists who want to strengthen the four pillars and progressives who want to destroy them. what are the four pillars? first, america was founded on the christian religion and predominantly influenced by protestantism. by the 20th century cat and jewish played an important role, the culture of 1900 was fundamentally protestant and even the progressives emerge from the liberal protestant churches. this reinforced the second exceptional pillar, common law, which causes that god has given her the law given from god to the people and bubbles upward to the rulers. this gives us the government of the people, by the people and for the people that lincoln referred to. common law stands in stark opposition to almost every other nation on earth that is develop some form of civil law in which it trickles down from the top. both germany and e
in latin america, and it will have huge consequences for the western hemisphere and the world. >>> also, if you thought black friday was crazy, check out the sales in europe. i'll explain. but first here's my take. >>> it's thanksgiving weekend, america. time to reflect on our good fortune. it's also a time that most americans think about the unusual origins of the united states, a land of immigrants. we see o ourselves as special in this way, and we are, except that we're not quite as exceptional as we think anymore. something fascinating has happened over the last two decades. other countries have been transforming themselves into immigrant societies, adopting many of america's best ideas, even improving on them. if you watched our immigration special back in june or read my piece in "time" magazine, you would know that canada and australia both have a higher percentage of people who are foreign born compared to the united states. in fact, on this dimension, america, which once led the world, looks like most western countries. germany and france, for example, have about the same perce
everybody here this fourthth animal america arab month of separation and it's my pleasure to join us here and many of us know that we are such a lucky city, and we are lucky because people around their world make their way to fraction, find hopey until the city they know that we celebrate our diversity and find strength in the different cultures that pretend together and now, i ask you also to bring me talent from the arab america communities to make me and help me lune run the city. yes, it's incredible. union, i think i can talk about how wonderful diversity is, but we have to get the talent from our communities to represent all of the different thing that we do in the city. and you know, tonight, even though there is something called a baseball game out there, but these wonderful events that we have in the city whether it's america's cup whether it's fleet week, whether it's the 49ers playing or the giants playing, even eventually when we land the superbowl it all board of trustees all of us, i know that what i'm doing as a mayor and making sure that i support smallbitions in the cit
. here's dave. >> welcome to america. welcome to government hand outs? a republican law makers demanding that the department of scort scort taking down the web site showing new immigrants how to sign from medicaid to food stamps. is this the new american dream. welcome to forbes on fox we'll go to mr. steve forbes elizabeth and rick and mike. steve, is this the america you know and love? >> no, david, it is not just immigrants of the country. people here now they are trying to mke dependent on the government. that means more votes for them and you center the hidous cartoon. birth to death. corrupting us and the immigrants and got to stop it >> rick, it is it a land of opportunity and hand outs. >> no one is handing it out. >> yes, they are. nit is just information that is available. same example -- information that shows up. anybody here in the table mitt romney, his father when he came here from mexico. he got that exact kind of government aid and he turned out to be predent of one of the nation's biggest autocompanis and became governor of the state of the michigan. >> my dear friend r
and issues whether it is health care or pay. >> they are choosing america's holiday season to get their message across and get their employers on the spot. you think that turns the sentiment against the unions. nit is not the best pr strategy. if i put my historian hat on here a bit. work is more hexploited in tough times. it is it the rise of the unions and the port problem as it were. they were violating the california state laws. we are talking about the union and so far. is is it a problem. njohnathon wayne mentioned the port of oaklandnd six percent of all u.s. goods. that is the union's point to cause disruption and hurt the economy. and i tell you, they have every right to strike but the employers have the rht to kick the ass to the curve. a job is a mutually agreeable trade. employers offering a job and if they don't like hit the brickings. >> do you think it is bador the economy over all. we are in a fiscal cliff and rough waters here and now this to deal with? >> i think it could be bad for the econy. they have the merchandise and this is not going to affect thanksgiving
the middle part is when it changed overnight with the o.j. verdict. tennis 3:00 p.m. 1995 went wide america saw the majority black jury eight acquit the what celebrity and blacks america ugh cheered the verdict america said the white guilt bank has shut down. overnight. [applause] not only would of fulfilling that happened to discourse and relations but to black people suddenly and -- justice jackson and all sharpener not the sole spokesperson certainly those policies of welfare reform law and order they have been demagogue when nixon says law-and-order we know what he talks about. those were reagan and bush and rudy guiliani bless his soul tens of thousands of black lives were saved when will fare was one of the reform to blacks of lives were saved in a different way law-and-order was so saved and bill clinton took credit for both. [laughter] and we have 12 years of paradise where i describe the many wonderful things that happened. people are not walking on eggshells is a more. people had to be worried you would innocently say a word then you would ruin your career, you'd be hated by all o
, thanks. >>> and coming up on "good morning america" -- holiday miracle. he was shot in the head defending his girlfriend on the way from a halloween party so how was he able to celebrate thanksgiving with his family. >>> still rolling the stones are going strong. kicking off a new tour tonight. >>> and a daring high dive. watch as a guy jumps from a shopping mall balcony into a fountain, will he make it? >> yes. the anatomy of a bad decision coming up on "fixation" on this sunday morning. don't go anywhere. we're back in a few moments. hey buddy, i bet mom would love this, huh? jack? jaaack? jaaack?! jack?! looks good ladies! jack! come on, stop the car. jack! no, no, no, no, no! the only thing more surprising than finding the perfect gifts.. niice. where you find them. how did you know? i had a little help. this is how to gift. this is sears. i need all the help i can get. i tell them, "come straight to the table." i say, "it's breakfast time, not playtime." "there's fruit, milk and i'm putting a little nutella on your whole-wheat toast." funny, that last part gets through. [ male
'm returning to america what america's given to me. >>reporter: a native of germany was 50 when he says they threw his father into a concentration camp for opposing hitler. months later a commander let the whole family escape. >> we were very depressed and sad that the germany which we loved was turning against us. >>reporter: the family fled to camps and scraped by after japan invaded china. >> we did whatever we could do to make a living. >>reporter: after nearly a decade he boarded a ship to the u.s. with a heart of hope. >> here was america. i knew home and the future before me. >>reporter: he started with nothing, but studied business at san francisco state university, opened up his own restaurant. it would become the square. he ran the restaurant for 26 years living the american dream. >> my heart is so full of love and care and gratitude to america for having let me in the country in the first place, and giving me the opportunity. >>reporter: when he considered the legacy gift, his wife, valerie, a nurse, suggested the nursing program at dominican where he's a trustee. he's expre
. everyone has that incentive, and as a result the rain forest its butchered. john: in america people own sections a forest. the government house forest. there are more forest fires in the government-owned forest and privately-owned forests. people have more incentive to take care of their would. >> plant more and to not cut it down early. that is the biggest problem. we see it with the pilgrims. they pick the corner early. fishing. keep the small fish rather than throwing it back if it's not your pond. it's a notion you throw it back. someone else will get it. keep it. if it's yours, let it grow to the size that it should. it is publicly owned, you worry about the oer pochard coming in and taking a. john: i understand how private ownership would work in some and land area, but i can't see how you do with the ocean. >> a cple issues. migrating fish, you can't really on the property. you can on the fish, have a certaintagged fish with electronic surveillance and other technologies, but the way they solve the problem with notions as the tuna. they build these enormous bins. it's a fish farm
the trpg in the waterfront work better. i have been to this commission talking about america's cup. that was a tremendously important experience. actually we treated that input from the outreach seriously and we rowntded up the input we got from america's cup and through the progress reports and at the cac meetings of this project and at the hearing we got input as well and on the website you will see pages of community input we managed and structured and categorized it and it's shaping this assessment for us. but i don't want to down play how important it was to play with the america's cup. we piloted and tried our hand at new things and erks lie and a project and carried hundreds of people and that is a pilot project that could have a legacy. we have the bike sharing program this spring and we work with the companies to do a proxy bike sharing program and get it place for the america's cup and valet parking and giving pedestrians real time estimates how long it goes from point a, say the ballpark to the ferry building and helping visitors orient themselves around the waterfro
high shipping costs, and you make made in america products more attractive to people abroad, and that's good. home sales rising for the first time in years. construction is start to go pick up. and historically low interest rates now averaging below 30% for a 30-year fixed mortgage will only fuel a rebound next year. and remember, a house will still be the most important asset for most americans, so a rebound there helps americans feel better about their financial situation and ready to spend a bit of money. stephen moore is a senior economics writer at the wall street journal as well as a member of its editor board. michelle is a senior economist at rbs and daniel gross is a columnist and business editor at "newsweek" daily beast. now we're likely to avert the worst of a fiscal cliff, unleash some of those spirits. we have things going on that will lead quite possibly to an economic rise, start bg now. am i wrong? >> i don't share your optimism about us not going over the fiscal cliff, but i also don't think it will matter. the coverage we've seen has been largely in spite of governm
san francisco one of the best baseball towns -- no, the best baseball town in america. [cheers and applause] let us now welcome and please show your love and enthusiasm the mayor of city and county of san francisco the honorable edwin lee. former mayor and current lieutenant governor the honorable gavin newsom. the city chief of protocol charlotte schultz, and her husband former secretary of state george schultz. former mayor willie brown. [cheers and applause] and former mayor frank jordan. we want to acknowledge the husband of united states senator and former mayor dianne feinstein, mr. richard bloom. the wife of former mayor gina mos coney and the wife of former mayor joe alliteo, catherine. the sister of former mayor george christopher. the board board and the rest of the city family who has made this event possible. we are also honored to be joined by several giants dignitaries. president and ceo larry baer and his wife sam. [cheers and applause] . giants vice president and general manager brian saibian and his wife amanda. [cheers and applause] the wife of the skip
, jaime to 65 transformed america. in the book, the bankrupt prizewinner explores the abyss of the passage of the voting rights act come the summer race riots in troop deployment to vietnam. he discusses the divisive year with howard university modern history professor, daryl scott. >> host: hello, jim. it is my pleasure to be here to discuss her new book, the eve of destruction, how 1965 transformed america. as you know, we historians love to ask one another how it became the issue decided to write about a given topic. what brought you to read about 1965? >> well, i cut 20th century 19th century history for a number of years, mostly at brown university. as we move through this thing, i started doing this in the 60s, so i didn't teach the 60s because it was in history. later on an important part of my courses and i've written some books which talked about aspects of the 60s. like a lot of other historians, i became a little bit uncomfortable with the notion that the 60s can be described as something 1960 to 1970. historians like to do this. they like to talk about the 30s or or the 20s or
, and asking for authority to sign for the general manager to sign the contract with shell energy north america and kick the program o off. that early notification period needs to meld well with the formal launch of the statutory opt out period, that's the opt out program we've talked about before that's required by the state. so we want those two components to work well together. we'll be presenting to you our key communication strategies and our overall budget, and again the proposed clean power sf timeline that factors in these changes, and in particular the early notification period concept. to given you a quick overview of the timeline, and with an emphasis on the action item for you, i'm turning to slide three, where, at this time period, we are reaching out to yourselves, to members of the board, to the mayor's office, we having the joint meeting with lafco to make sure we're really on track with the intentions from the board and the mayor, making sure that we are putting together a customer notification education plan that's supportive of your intentions. we'll be asking you to approve
had a world class multi-purpose arena. there's no city half itself size in america that doesn't have this and as a result many world class acts bypass san francisco. we will now have a place for the family shows, those concerts and performances and to date we haven't had a location for. one of our mostarden supporters and the san francisco convention bureau, sf travel. they see this project as filling a distinct void in the city's portfolio thattee can make available for conventions and meetings and events in our city. very important. we will make a promise with jobs and 1700 permanent positions and over 4,000 other jobs and aggressive hiring and business commitments new economic engine for this part of our city. we will create massive economic benefits. jenn just ran through those. 10 to 20 million annual direct tax few revenue to the city. over $50 million of one time impact fees and 60 million annually in new visitor spending. all of that again without any money from the city's general fund or any new taxes and last but not least we want to use this arena as an engineer to
and in iran stuck around for decades, and it's that role that really represented america's influence that stemmed from world war ii, the pro longed war in the gulf. >> host: professor, i think of the british when i think of the involvement in the middle east. when and how did they step back their involvement? >> guest: well, with regard to the gulf, the brits arrived in the 1800s. and it represented their quest to provide order to a part of -- on the flanks to their imperial interests in india. the southern coast of the gulf had been called in the 1800s, the pirate coast, and the constantly feuding tribes fused with one another, which spill out into the sea-born approaches to india, and result in attacks on india, and possibly resulting weakness that might bring another great power. so the british found themselves pulled into the gulf in the 1800s. not to colonize as they did further to the east in india but, rather to maintain order there, and they did, with a relatively small amount of military force. but you're right, the story in the 1800s, and the 1900s, until the early 1970s, w
in the world and we have honors such as the greenest city in north america, the walkable city, and the best green policies, the green tech of north america and forbes recognized that san francisco has the most green jobs in the united states. that's jobs. that's one of the most important things we are doing for the whole country. [applause] and we are creating and sustaining jobs as well as supporting new industries in our city. our energy watch program creates or sustains 180 jobs a year. san francisco has now achieved 80% landfill diversion rate setting the national recycling and compost records as the high of any city in north america. [applause] and by the way as a former public works director you ought ton how proud i am. we have the best compost in the united states and in fact it's sold to all of the wineries in napa that make and produce the best wines in the world. our partners employs over a thousand green collar employees and solar sf resulted in hiring from employees from disadvantaged communities in the work force program. i want to acknowledge and thank green build towar
understand to be modern america's realization of the american dream and the american story is a way to raise awareness of the less glamorous parts of america's history. that's frankly not true. meanwhile meditating cat has managed to block out the controversy. >> was that its tail? thank god. jedediah, i know you are -- i need to ask you a question. does this accomplish anything other than make the student union feel like they have accomplished something? it doesn't have anything to do with education. it has to do with feeling. >> it has to do with diversity. i am someone who always says campuses lean left. they ban ann coulter. if you are -- you are going to meet a conservative and talk about diversity and then you say well everything is allowed. let these people speak their mind. you can hold something in opposition to it on campus, but the problem is that campuses oftentimes only allow things when they are convenient. >> a very good point. >> what do you make of this? are we ever going to get tired of these weird protests? >> it is ridiculous. i heard potluck dinner and i heard marijuana
as the insulting term they use is america's mercenaries, because we paid for the -- a lot of the military hardware and transportation and logistics and extra pay the thai troops received. they also tend to focus on those thais who are engaged in black market schemes. the truth behind it all is that thai soldiers were fighting, were dying, for four years thailand was sort of carrying out the war, what they saw at their war, in south vietnam. so, the casualties are something we should keep in mind. >> host: professor ruth, when did thai relations start to gel? thailand has been an ally for a longtime and participated in the iraq war and world war ii. >> guest: yaw can date back to the example of offering abraham lincoln war elephant for his troubles. the american civil war, but definitely in the 20th 20th century, thais were always close u.s. allies, and this is intensified -- disrupted partly during the second world war, but as soon as the cold war gels, thailand pretty much comes in along as a strong u.s. ally, and definitely a strong cold war ally in terms of being an anticommunist component to t
for nearly 20 years becoming known as the most trusted man in america for his objective, straightforward reporting. he was the face of cbs. three years after he stepped down from the news anger desk, the school was named in is honored. that grew over the next 25 years. today three years after his passing, he continues to be our guiding light. it is truly a special honor to have jeff fager with us tonight to talk about the traditional values of journalism and how those values remain the cornerstone of cbs news today in our digital age. he became the chairman and february 2011. cbs news won a peabody award under his leadership and was the only network to grow its audience. he also has relaunched cbs this morning with a focus on a harder news. he has served as executive producer of 60 minutes giving it a new graphical again emphasizing more timeless stories. he also grew the show's online presence by revamping 60 and launching the ipad app. under his leadership, 60 minutes reaches an estimated 121 million unique viewers a season. more than double that of the nearest competitor a
across america right now. be an early bird, get your ticket, because as the frenzy builds and the wednesday night jackpot approaches, that line is expected to climb and the lines should climb with them. a mad dash saturday night for the last-minute chance to win $325 million, the thanksgiving weekend payout to be truly thankful for. >> who knows, you know. somebody's got to win. >> reporter: but those six numbers proved to be more elusive than a mall parking spot on black friday. the bright side, the unwon powerball jackpot now swells to an estimated $425 million. the largest jackpot in powerball history. enough dough to buy 2,000 ferraris or the entire country of anguillas twice. >> that kind of money. i'd have a heart attack. >> reporter: it also surpasses the previous powerball record of $365 million. that windfall claimed by eight co-workers in lincoln, nebraska, back in 2006. the odds of winning your $425 million, still about 1 in 175 million, or to put it another way, that's about 25 times less likely than you winning an academy award. even slimmer than your chances
start with a portrait of america, and i call it a portrait to make it really clear from the very start that i have absolutely no aesthetic sense whatsoever. [laughter] but this is a sort of a portrait. i've taken the 3,000 odd counties in this country, and i've split them into ten. each dot represents roughly 300 counties on the basis of their density levels. because at their heart cities are the absence of physical space between people. cities are proximity, density, closeness. the bottom line shows the relationship between density and income. as you can see, there's a steadily increasing relationship there where the densest tenth of america's counties earn on average on a per capita basis 50% more than the people living in the least dense half of america's counties. this is a common phenomenon in the united states and throughout the world. the three largest metropolitan areas in this country produce 18% of our nation's gdp, almost a fifth, while including only 13 percent of america's population. the top line shows something that may be something more surprising. it's the relationship
. whether it be the america's cup, sunday games, giants streets they will wake up for the car that is typically legally parked on this their street and find out they can't get it back but for a $500 fibromyalgiav. i protionx posed to the public if your community can help us figure out an app so if i provided my cell phone to city government, we can let you know if the street cleaning is going to happen tomorrow. we propose this had last year. mayor lee was supportive. we're still waiting for it to happen, idea number one. idea number two, my constituents ask me can you tell us where every single dollar in city government goes? whether it goes to an individual, nonprofit, someone providing goods and services in our city? last year i proposed an open budget application so that we could drill down and know where every single penny of city government is being spent. i want to thank our budget director who is here, our city controller. we are working on this, but we are still months away from getting the data that we need to provide this information to you. my third idea, i want to
security committee, new york republican peter king. then where does america stand on the verge of a second obama term in office? the economy, the fiscal cliff talks, the president's priorities in the next four years. our roundtable is here. david brooks of "the new york times." msnbc's reverend al sharpton. former ceo of hewlett-packard carly fiorina >> historian and film maker ken burns. and nbc chief foreign affairs correspondent andrea mitchell. and we'll hear from new york congressman, gregory meeks, as we check in on some of the hardest-hit victims of hurricane sandy and see how they offered thanks this weekend while surrounded by destruction. >>> from nbc news in washington, the world's longest-running television program, this is "meet the press." with david gregory. >>> president obama doing his part for the economy over the weekend out holiday shopping as part of small business saturday, picking up several children's book at an independent bookstore in arlington. >>> meanwhile, uncertainty in the middle east. more clashes in egypt over the weekend as police use tear gas this mornin
that money is really making america any safer. keene, new hampshire, is a small, quaint new england town so it seemed strange when the police department needed an armored vehicle like this called a bearcat to fight terrorism. >> i couldn't imagine what they meant. >> reporter: what did they list as potential terrorist targets? >> the pumpkin festival that we hold every october that's held right here. >> reporter: in the town square. >> in the town square. >> reporter: does it get out of control, the pumpkin festival? >> no. >> reporter: although it wasn't the only thing they cited the festival was a big part of their argument for the $286,000 bearcat. but it turns out keene didn't have to foot the bill. u.s. taxpayers did. all across the country law enforcement departments are getting the latest in military style equipment from armored cars to flying drones. republican senator tom coburn of oklahoma had his office follow the money and released the findings exclusively to nbc news. how much money are we talking about? >> over a period of years, billions. >> reporter: billions of dollars? >>
on in understanding the transportation mediation and impacts going forward and since we experienced america's cup now twice i am wondering in the interim and the mode of continuous improvement given that i think we already have some congestion that we experience on the embarcadero what are some of the steps could be taken for the neighborhood and community now rather than waiting for all the studies to be completed? i think we had findings already out of the recent experiences with fleet week and everything else and what is your department doing to change it and whether it's the traffic lights or i will throw it out -- do we take away things and create more traffic lanes and i don't know and outrageous ideas like that. >> or bike tracks. >> thank you. what we found out the opportunity to pilot has been invaluable because working with america's cup some of the data is now extraordinary. bart alone carried 250,000 more people than it typically does and the giant's celebration day and the important tool we have been working with is having the incident command system. it's not once in a while team that
. gary k, i think that's the point. businesses aren't making money in america, and sometimes, sometimes the public gets a little bewildered because the market's high beau that's not in direct correlation to our economy. >> i use the word potential. i've been saying this for-- it's a few years now, the potential forhis economy keeps getting headwinds, what's the headwinds? the uncertainty out of washington and the potential for higher taxes. we don't have a tax problem, we don't have a revenue problem forashington d.c. this year, we'll ha-- they'll be close to the highest revenues ever back from 2007. spending is up over 800 billion dollars this year, than it was in 2007. that's where the deficits are coming from. that's what should be talked about more than taxing people o are working their rear ends off to do better for themselves. >> i've got to tell you i don't like when warren buffett is brought into a discussion about people making $250,000. >> two different worlds. >> he's a very good business man. >> an amazing businessman, he doesn't car about taxes. >> he's not the only busines
of balance. i'm shannon bream, live in washington. america's news headquarters begins with the latest from cairo with steve hariggan, standing by live. >> reporter: the numbers are building of protesters here in tahrir square, the number of tents growing as the protesters say they are here to stay and digging in. on the street below me, over the past few minutes, we have seen young protesters, lighting bottles on fire and running. the skirmishes have wounded more than 3 people. we have seen the military begin to move large concrete block, blocking off certain narrow alleyways and protecting government buildings. explosions can be heard behind me. right now, one key thing to watch is where the protests go next. we are expecting major demonstrations on both sides on tth. those who support president morsi and think he is doing what needs to be done. and those who think he is making a power grab, trying to become a dictator. both groups will try to get out their constituents on tuesday. it will be a real test of power. the final thing to watch, the country's judges, many are saying they are go
and business leaders, government from all our americas for example, central america, mexico, south america. these programs could introduce cross cultural knowledge and international relationships in a positive powerful way for our students in this country and these other countries to visit here to join this city and experience this incredible potential facility that it once again would be a model for the sports arenas in the future that would include education because i believe it's imperative that we do that and for the benefit of the public who have not heard me speak my proposal is on my website and i will include this latest letter on my website and i wish everyone well. >> okay. next up is corine woods and michael ginter. >> good afternoon commissioners my name is corine woods. i'm an alternate to the new arena cac and also serve on several other advisory groups around waterfront issues. i wanted to echo katie ladel's comment which is that we had a lot of information, a lot of documents to read. i'm sure you have read them all, especially the fiscal feasibility study and all four
, we met those to standards that have been outlined. it is time for america to deal with the spending problem. we have listened to the american people, and make sure that we cannot get into the spot again. this is the the shot in the 20 years i have been here to build support for a budget -- a balanced budget. this is sorely needed, we have never gotten ourselves into the mess that we are in. this is important for the fiscal future but also for the fact that our economy needs to get going. beginning to take steps to fixing the fiscal problems, the people we expect to reinvest in our economy are doing a great job. >> we had a president asking us for a blank check and he did not get this. and a big increase on job creators. we got the -- we got that. and we have been trying to get discretionary spending caps in loss since i have been here for 13 years. we have been introducing legislation for the last eight years to get caps on spending. we could not get this the last time the republicans were in the majority. we see this as a good step in the right direction. every cent down payment in
right now. this is america's number one financial news report, "wall street journal report." now maria bartiromo. >> the kick off to the most important shopping season of the year is underway. it is started earlier some retailers opened their doors on thursday night after thanksgiving dinner. it got off to a good start and analysts expect sales to rise a little more than 4%, not as strong as last year. retailers earned one-third of their profits during the holiday season and consumers make up 70% of the u.s. economy. during the holiday-shortened week the markets moved in tandem for the fiscal cliff. up more midweek. the markets continued to climb on friday. stunning accusations that one of america's iconic companies hewlett-packard which acquired autonomy last year for $11 billion is accusing autonomy of what it called serious improprieties in its bookkeeping and inflating its own value. meg witman says the company lied about how much it was worth. >> we believe there's a willful effort on the part of certain members of autonomy management to mislead shareholders when they were a publi
. what should the united states of america do? saying this unacceptable. we thank mr. morsi for his efforts in brokering a cease-fire, which is fragile but this is not what the united states of america taxpayers expect and our dollars will be directly related to the progress towards democracy which you promised the people of egypt when your party and you were elected president. >> chris: let's talk about that because morsi took his steps ours after secretary of state hillary clinton praised him for helping to broker the peace deal between hamas and israel and the administration issued the state department a tepid criticism. how tough should they get? should they say you have to pull back? what should our demands and leverage be? >> our leverage is not only substantial bayance and aid, plus an imf deal but the marshaling world public opinion is also against this kind of move by mr. morsi. we appreciate president morsi's action but in the past it's always been the united states that's brokered these deals and there's a clear perception amongst hamas that they won on this one. unfortun
about any new view of about any new view@of jesus in america. we'll ask the author of american stephen broth row with another view on the live line. captions produced by visual audio captioning barack obama barac barack obama barack obama >> dr. stephen prothero, welcome. your book has a central proposition, what is the proposition in the book? >> i think there's two. one is that jesus is many and mal oohable, there isn't just one jesus but there's many and the other is that jesus isn't just for christians in the ited states, christians love jesus but so do buddhists and jews and hindus and people without any religion whatsoever. >> the jus image is multiadaptble because we are a 3489 rigious nation. >> that's right, we're a multireligious nation but also a christian nation where 80% or so of the country are christians and they put jesus on the national agenda and then people of all different religions and without anyt all respond to that figure. >> why did thomas jefferson the bible by omitting a lot of it in his own text of the bible as you began your bo
regulating to disaster, have green jobs policies are damaging america's economy. in fact, she subjects the assumptions and policies which led to such elevated as of now bankrupt seller paid no manufacture as well as the electric car battery manufacturer to a withering analysis, which we at the institute have come to expect from this oxford trained economist who served as chief of staff of the council of economic advisers -- sorry. during the administration of president george w. bush. while the serving direct investments in private firms and cautionary tales for those who tell the government rather than private investors allocate capital. they can't stay in its first year as an institute senior fellow, a year in which he is to prolific and influential cited by writers, reporters, talkshow host across the country. i think in particular many contributions to a series called issues 2012 ranging from her analysis demonstrating even adjusting the state of the economy receiving food stamps is at an all-time high. we've heard that occurred in the campaign. she made clear the oil companies so
. >> i'd like to see taxes go down and someone say america is great. let's do everything we can to eliminate obstacles to success vmax my next guestsays that regulations are really killing business. we have congressman eric cantor, the house majority leader is pushing to cut the red tape. and since he does have out there, he actually has a shot at doing it. it's just too hard right now for businesses to continue to operate, given all the onerous and burdensome regulations coming out of washington. and we want to make that stop so we can turn the country around and began to be a starter country again. we know that the obama administration over the course of the term has imposed 400 regulations that impose more than $100 million of costs annually on small businesses. the small business administration has said that there are so many regulatory burdens on small business that it cost them $10,000 per employee. those are the kinds of things that we want to stop right now so we can see more startup and jobs created. >> is one thing to ope for freezing regulations. but i guess we had ho
divided. not in the goal, but how we get there, and i think america is too. i think that is reflected i think we now know that americans expect us to go forward, and we have no choice but to go forward. >> i think kay has made a very important point. one of the things that's troubled me about the analysis of congress is people act as if we're in a bubble and we just were self-generated. i mean, there are few people in this building that aren't here because they didn't get -- they should be doing self-criticism. it's exacerbated by one of the great inventions, creations of our humanity, which is the american constitution. at any given time america is governed by the results of three elections. that's our constitution. there are senators elected in 2006 who are here. there's a president elected in 2008 and then a house of representatives predominantly 2010, and occasionally the -- there have been few cases in american history where the public changed its mind so drastically between 2008 and 2010 so they put one group in power here and another group in power there, and there were legitimat
. the bottom of the hour, time now for the top of the news, america mourning the loss of a tv icon. actor larry hagman passed away yesterday. at the age of 81. best remembered for his role as a scheming oil man, j.r. ewing in the hit show "dallas." >>> egypt, growing protests after the new islamist president, mohamed morsi, gave himself virtually unlimit power until the country drafts a new constitution. his opponents calling the move extreme and they warn of growing turmoil and military intervention if the power grab is not withdrawn. >>> and the fragile cease-fire between israel and hamas appears to be holding. some border restrictions in gaza being eased but the threat, a top hamas leader saying the ruling militant group will continue to arm itself despite an israeli border blockade. connor powell has the latest from jerusalem. >> reporter: harris, just three days ago, it appeared that israel and hamas were on the brink of a full-on war but the cease-fire is holding and there are encouraging signs life is returning to normal, here in the holy land. israeli children returned to school yesterd
it because you feel bad for me. i will be at the villages. >> america's fri >> announcer: tonight on huckabee, she was paralyzed as a teenager. >> i can't do a life in a wheelchair without use of my hand or legs. >> announcer: then, another challenge. >> as if being quadriplegic wasn't enough, she has breast cancer. >> announcer: she stays strong with a positive outlook on life. >> divine alignment happens in every one of our lives. >> reporter: coincidences, chance encounters or part of a bigger plan. >> god is moving us along toward our destiny. >> reporter: plus, syndicated talk show host larry elder how a man-to-man talk end aid family feud between father and son. >> announcer: ladies and gentlemen, governor mike huckabee. [applause]. >> gov. mike huckabee: thank you, thank you very much. thank you very much, audience. and, welcome to huckabee from the fox news studios in new york city. i hope that you and your family are enjoying some precious and special time together, during this thanksgiving holiday. you know, we all have a lot to be grateful for but sometimes we have to s
alternatives that will hamper urban america and america generally. the cost of the ticket to actually get in and complete college represent a barrier that i believe will ultimately injured our economy. not only that, but a rapid change in technological revolutions has created a spatial mismatch between the kinds of jobs that are going to be available going forward and the kinds of people who are able to take those jobs. that problem is most acutely seen in urban communities, which have been coming to your point, dealing with more basic concerns more so than trying to prepare and get ready and respond to changes in going forward. that is for those who are actually going to college and graduated. we have not even talked about those who are not. our young people are following what is going on. they are seen with their older friends are dealing with an understandably wonder about their prospects. we have to play -- pay close attention to that. i am a high art educator and i teach in a public university system. in the state where i teach, virginia, you see a number of state legislative budget
-- character that's gone through life with him. just general america. it's true that it's harder today than it was for my generation, but there are some opportunities. but i think bruce -- bruce is a very unique character, a real life force. you can always learn a lot by watching him and listening to him and he is a working guy. when i first met tim -- him he was broke, living in a surfboard factory. and the most impressive thing about him which i've always tried to emulate ever since, but never been able to quite get there, he was completely uncompromising. there was nothing anyone had that he wanted that would make him compromise his art or his position, you know? and he's that guy. so i don't -- i mean i just think that america, like everyone else believes or most people belief, is at a crossroads right now. if you go to other countries, especially asia and other stuff, importing all their students to get educated here and exporting all the brain power out right after that, i think it's a real problem, you know? but there's nhing i can do about that except try to make great music and gre
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